Your Child's Healthy Smile

  • By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS
  • 10 May, 2017

Learn How Your Child's Teeth Develop and Preventing Tooth Decay

Dr. Mark Grucella with young patient

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that a child's first visit to the dentist should occur by 12 months of age. This visit will enable the dentist to evaluate your child and introduce you to proper oral hygiene. Diet, fluoride, finger and pacifier habits and tooth eruption will be discussed to insure optimal dental health.

Tooth Eruption Chart

Teeth vary in size, shape and their location in the jaws. These differences enable teeth to work together to help you chew, speak and smile. They also help give your face its shape and form. At birth people usually have 20 baby (primary) teeth, which start to come in (erupt) at about 6 months of age. They fall out (shed) at various times throughout childhood. By age 21, all 32 of the permanent teeth have usually erupted.

The following chart shows when your child's primary teeth (also called baby teeth or deciduous teeth) should erupt and shed. Eruption times vary from child to child.

Permanent Teeth Development

The first teeth begin to break through the gums at about 6 months of age. Usually, the first two teeth to erupt are the two bottom central incisors (the two bottom front teeth). Next, the top four front teeth emerge. After that, other teeth slowly begin to fill in, usually in pairs - one each side of the upper or lower jaw - until all 20 teeth (10 in the upper jaw and 10 in the lower jaw) have come in by the time the child is 2 to 3 years old.

 Some interesting facts about primary teeth:

  • Girls generally precede boys in tooth eruption
  • Usually for every 6 months of life approximately 4 teeth will erupt
  • Lower teeth usually erupt before upper teeth
  • Teeth in both jaws usually erupt in pairs - one on the right and one on the left
  • Primary teeth are smaller in size and whiter in color than the permanent teeth that will follow
  • Shortly after age 4, the jaw and facial bones of the child begin to grow, creating spaces between the primary teeth. This is a perfectly natural growth process that provides the necessary space for the larger permanent teeth to emerge.

Why It's Important to Care for Baby Teeth

While it's true that baby teeth are only in the mouth a short period of time, they play a vital role. Baby teeth:

  • Reserve space for their permanent teeth
  • Give the face its normal appearance
  • Aid in the development of clear speech
  • Help attain good nutrition (missing or decayed teeth make it difficult to chew, causing children to reject foods)
  • Help give a healthy start to the permanent teeth (decay and infection in baby teeth can cause damage to the permanent teeth developing beneath them)

Does Your Child Need Dental Sealants?

Dental sealant is thin, vinyl material that is placed in the grooves and pits of adult back teeth (molars and premolars) to prevent cavities. Sealants are applied to the chewing surfaces in the pits and grooves of teeth where cavities occur more often. The sealant quickly bonds into the depressions and grooves of the teeth, forming a protective shield over the enamel of each tooth.

Although thorough brushing and flossing can remove food particles and plaque from smooth surfaces of teeth, they cannot always get into all the pits and grooves of the back teeth to remove the food and plaque. Sealants protect these vulnerable areas from tooth decay by "sealing out" plaque and food.


Who Should Get Sealants?

Because of the likelihood of developing decay in the depressions and grooves of the premolars and molars, children and teenagers are candidates for sealants. However, adults without decay or fillings in their molars can also benefit from sealants.

Typically, children should get sealants on their permanent molars and premolars as soon as these teeth come in. In this way, the sealants can protect the teeth through the cavity-prone years of ages 6 to 14.


How Are Sealants Applied?

Applying sealant is a simple and painless process. NO DRILLNG!!! It takes only a few minutes for your dentist or hygienist to apply the sealant to seal each tooth. The application steps are as follows:

1. First the teeth that are to be sealed are thoroughly cleaned.

2. Each tooth is then dried, and cotton or another absorbent material is put around the tooth to keep it dry.

3. An acid solution is put on the chewing surfaces of the teeth to roughen them up, which helps the sealant bond to the teeth.

4. The teeth are then rinsed and dried.

5. Sealant is then painted onto the tooth enamel, where it bonds directly to the tooth and hardens. Special curing light is used to help the sealant harden.


How Long Do Sealants Last?

Sealants can protect teeth from decay for up to 10 years, but they need to be checked for chipping or wearing at regular dental check-ups. Your dentist can replace sealants as necessary.

Does Insurance Cover the Cost of Sealants?

Many insurance companies cover the cost of sealants. Check with your dental insurance carrier to determine if sealants are covered under your plan.

Fluoride

Fluoride is a natural mineral that helps prevent cavities in children and adults by making the outer surface of teeth (the enamel) more resistant to acids that cause tooth decay.


How fluoride is beneficial?

Fluoride is advantageous to dental health because of its systemic effects before tooth eruption and topical effects after tooth eruption. Before teeth erupt, fluoride taken in from foods, beverages and dietary supplements make tooth enamel stronger, and more resistant to tooth decay. This provides what is called the "systemic" benefit. After teeth erupt, fluoride helps rebuild weakened tooth enamel and reverses early signs of tooth decay. By brushing teeth with fluoride toothpaste or using fluoride dental products the fluoride provides topical benefits.


Where fluoride is found?

Fluoride is naturally found in most water sources , rivers, lakes, wells and even the oceans. For years it has been added to public water supplies to help prevent tooth decay. Certain foods contain fluoride but usually not enough to constitute a significant part of the day's need for cavity prevention. Meat, eggs, vegetables, cereals and fruits have very small but measurable amounts, whereas tea and fish have large amounts. Food cooked in fluoridated water retain fluoride from the cooling water. Bottled or filtrated water usually does NOT contain optimal fluoride.


Toothpaste with fluoride has been responsible for a significant drop in cavities. It is recommended to brush at least two times each day (morning and night) for two minutes each time you brush.

Recommended Brushing Practices for Young Children

For children younger than 3 years old, start brushing their teeth as soon as their teeth start to appear with non-fluorinated toothpaste or just with a small size (grain of rice) fluorinated toothpaste.

For children 3 to 6 years old, use no more than a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Always supervise your child's brushing to make sure they use the right amount and try to get your child to spit out most of the toothpaste after brushing.

Mouthwashes

Fluoridated mouthwashes could also help to prevent cavities but children six years old or younger should not use it unless it has been recommended by a dentist. Many children younger than 6 years old are more likely to swallow it than spit it out because their swallow reflexes are not fully developed.

Dentists or dental hygienists may apply topical fluoride for children and adults who are at a high risk for cavities at regular appointments for cleanings.

To learn more, please contact us by calling 330-733-7911 or send us a website message at any time.  

GG Dentist Blog

By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 17 Jul, 2017

Teeth whitening is among the most popular cosmetic dental procedures available, as it can quickly and significantly improve the overall appearance of your smile. 

Most people suffer from discolored teeth to some degree. Even those who brush, floss, and complete regular dental check-ups may experience a decrease in the natural radiance of their teeth over time. Teeth whitening lightens teeth and helps to remove stains and discoloration. 

By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 10 May, 2017

The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that a child's first visit to the dentist should occur by 12 months of age. This visit will enable the dentist to evaluate your child and introduce you to proper oral hygiene. Diet, fluoride, finger and pacifier habits and tooth eruption will be discussed to insure optimal dental health.

By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 30 Mar, 2017

X-rays, also known as radiographs, capture images of the parts of your mouth your dentist can’t see. That’s because hard tissues like bones and teeth absorb more radiation than softer gum and cheek tissues, creating a picture that clearly shows differences between these types of tissues. 

Dentist can use X-ray technology to diagnose cavities, gum disease, infection, tooth cracks, bone loss and other problems that aren’t visible to the eye. In addition, X-rays help the dentist find and treat dental problems early in their development, which can potentially save you money and unnecessary discomfort. X-rays play a big part in keeping your teeth and gums healthy.

What Problems Can Dental X-Rays Detect?

Dental X-rays can be used to:

  • Show areas of decay that may not be visible with an oral exam, especially cavities between teeth
  • Identify cavities occurring under an existing filling
  • Reveal bone loss and periodontal disease
  • Reveal changes in the bone or in the root canal resulting from infection
  • Assist in the preparation of tooth implants, braces, dentures, or other dental procedures
  • Reveal an abscess (an infection at the root of a tooth)
  • Reveal other developmental abnormalities, such as cysts and some types of tumors
  • Incipient (early stage) decay
  • See the status of developing teeth
  • Determine if primary teeth are being lost quickly enough to allow permanent teeth to come in properly
  • Check for the development of wisdom teeth and identify if the teeth are impacted (unable to emerge through the gums)

How Often Should Teeth Be X-Rayed?

The frequency of getting X-rays of your teeth often depends on your medical and dental history and current condition. Some people may need X-rays as often as every six months; others with no recent dental or gum disease and who visit their dentist regularly may get X-rays only once a year. If you are a new patient, your dentist may take X-rays as part of the initial exam and to establish a baseline record from which to compare changes that may occur over time.

People who fall into the high risk category who may need X-rays taken more frequently include:

  • Children generally need more X-rays than adults because their teeth and jaws are still developing and because their teeth are smaller and enamel of their teeth is finer. As a result, decay can reach the inner part of the tooth, dentin, quicker and spread faster.
  • Adults with extensive restorative work, such as fillings, crowns and bridges to look for decay beneath existing fillings.
  • Adults that wear removable appliance like dentures and partials.
  • People who drink a lot of sugary and acidic beverages .
  • People with periodontal disease to monitor bone loss.
  • People who have dry mouth - called xerostomia - whether due to medications or disease states (such as Sjogren's syndrome, damaged salivary glands, radiation treatment to head and neck). Dry mouth conditions can lead to the development of cavities.
  • Smokers to monitor bone loss resulting from periodontal disease. 

How Safe Are Dental X-Rays?

Exposure to all sources of radiation -- including the sun, minerals in the soil, appliances in your home, and dental X-rays -- can damage the body's tissues and cells and can lead to the development of cancer in some instances. Fortunately, the dose of radiation you are exposed to during the taking of dental X-rays is extremely small, especially if your dentist is using digital X-rays.

Advances in dentistry over the years have lead to a number of measures that will minimize the risks associated with X-rays. However, even with the advancements in safety, the effects of radiation are added together over a lifetime. So every little bit of radiation you receive from all sources counts.

If you are concerned about radiation exposure due to X-rays, talk to your dentist about how often X-rays are needed and why they are being taken.

Types of Dental X-Rays:

·        Bite-Wing x-rays show both lower and upper back teeth in one x-ray. These types of x-rays are used to diagnose in-between and chewing surface cavities. They are also used to evaluate bone around the teeth and aid in diagnosing periodontal disease.

·        Panoramic x-ray shows a broad view of the teeth, entire jaws, nasal area, sinus and large lower jaw nerves. This type of x-rays are usually used for extractions, implant placements, locating and evaluating 3rd (wisdom) molars, looking for any abnormalities (cysts or abscesses) and when going thru orthodontic treatments.

·        Periapical x-rays provide a view of the entire tooth, from the crown to the bone that helps to support the tooth. These type of x-rays are used to find dental problems below the gum line or in the jaw, such abscesses, cysts, and bone changes.

·        3D images or Cone Beam Imaging is a diagnostic imaging technology that uses radiation in a manner similar to conventional radiographic imaging, with the difference being that cone beam images are converted into a three-dimensional view that can then be manipulated by computer software for a wide variety of applications, including implant, orthodontic, TMJ, and diagnostic purposes.

For more information, please contact us at your convenience by calling 330-733-7911 or sending us a website message.  


By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 28 Mar, 2017

Did you know that average person produces a quart of saliva a day? 

The amount of saliva you produce in a lifetime is enough to fill two swimming pools!

By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 18 Mar, 2017

What Is A Crown?

A crown is a cover or “cap” your dentist can put on the tooth to restore its shape and size, strength, and improve its appearance. The crowns, when cemented into place, fully encase the entire visible portion of a tooth that lies at and above the gum line. 

The purpose of the crown is to make the tooth stronger or improve the way it looks.

Why You May Need a Dental Crown

You may need a crown if you:

  • Have a cavity that is too large for a filling
  • Have a broken tooth  or a tooth that has been severely worn down
  • Have a tooth with a large filling or fractures
  • Are missing tooth and need  a bridge 
  • Need to cover misshapen or severely discolored teeth
  • Need to cover a dental implant
  • Need to make a cosmetic modification
  • Have had root canal treatment (the crown will protect the restored tooth from breaking)

How A Crown is Placed

Preparing a tooth for a crown usually requires two visits to the dentist -- the first step involves examining and preparing the tooth, the second visit involves placement of the permanent crown.

First Visit: Examining and Preparing The Tooth.

At the first visit in preparation for a crown, your dentist may take a few X-rays to check the roots of the tooth receiving the crown and surrounding bone. If the tooth has extensive decay or if there is a risk of infection or injury to the tooth's pulp, a root canal treatment may first be performed.

Before the process of making a crown begins, your dentist will anesthetize (numb) the tooth and the gum tissue around the tooth. Next, the tooth receiving the crown is filed down along the chewing surface and sides to make room for the crown. The amount removed depends on the type of crown used. If a large area of the tooth is missing (due to cavity or damage), your dentist will use filling material to "build up" the tooth to support the crown.

After reshaping the tooth, your dentist typically will use a paste or putty to make an impression of the tooth to receive the crown. Impressions of the teeth above and below the tooth to receive the dental crown will also be made to make sure that the crown will not affect your bite.

The impressions are then sent to a dental lab where the crown will be manufactured. The crown is usually returned to your dentist's office in two to three weeks. During this first office visit your dentist will make a temporary crown to cover and protect the prepared tooth while the crown is being made. Temporary crowns usually are made of acrylic and are held in place using a temporary cement.

Second Visit: Receiving The Permanent Dental Crown

At the second visit, your dentist will remove the temporary crown and check the fit and color of the permanent crown. If everything is acceptable, a local anesthetic will be used to numb the tooth and the new crown is permanently cemented in place.

Caring for Temporary Dental Crowns

Because temporary dental crowns are just that -  a temporary fix until a permanent crown is ready  - most dentists suggest that a few precautions. These include:

  • Avoid sticky, chewy foods
  • Try to chew on the different side
  • Avoid chewing hard foods
  • Slide flossing material out-rather than lifting out-when cleaning your teeth.
  • If temporary crown comes off your should call your dental office to have it re-cemented

  How Long Do Dental Crowns Last?

On average, dental crowns last between five and 15 years. The life span of a crown depends on the amount of "wear and tear" the crown is exposed to, how well you follow good oral hygiene practices, and your personal mouth-related habits (you should avoid such habits as grinding or clenching your teeth, chewing ice, biting fingernails, and using your teeth to open packaging).

Types of Dental Crowns Available

Permanent crowns can be made from stainless steel, all metal (such as gold or another alloy), porcelain-fused-to-metal, all resin, or all ceramic.

  • Stainless steel crowns are prefabricated crowns that are used on permanent teeth primarily as a temporary measure. The crown protects the tooth or filling while a permanent crown is made from another material. For children, a stainless steel crown is commonly used to fit over a primary tooth that's been prepared to fit it. The crown covers the entire tooth and protects it from further decay. When the primary tooth comes out to make room for the permanent tooth, the crown comes out naturally with it.
    • Gold crowns withstand biting and chewing forces well and probably last the longest in terms of wear down. Also, gold crowns rarely chip or break. The metallic color is the main drawback. Gold crowns are a good choice for out-of-sight molars.
    • Porcelain-fused-to-metal dental crowns can be color matched to your adjacent teeth. However, more wearing to the opposing teeth occurs with this crown type compared with metal or resin crowns. The crown's porcelain portion can also chip or break off. Next to all-ceramic crowns, porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns look most like normal teeth. However, sometimes the metal underlying the crown's porcelain can show through as a dark line, especially at the gum line and even more so if your gums recede. These crowns can be a good choice for front or back teeth as well as long bridges where the metal is needed for strength.
    All porcelain dental crowns provide better natural color match than any other crown type and may be more suitable for people with metal allergies. All ceramic crowns are a good choice for front teeth. 

    Caring for Your Teeth and Crowns

    To prevent damage to a crown, there are a few things you can do:

    • Avoid chewing ice or other hard objects like pencils. This is especially important for tooth-colored crowns
    • Wear night guard if you clench or grind your teeth
    • Be sure to see your dentist and dental hygienist for regular exams and teeth cleaning
    • Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day
    • Use fluoridated mouth washes at least once a day

    Contact Us for More Information

    If you would like to learn more about dental crowns or have questions about whether or not you need a crown, please contact us by calling 330-733-7911 or send us a website message .  


    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 25 Feb, 2017
    If you get frequent jaw pain, headaches, ear aches, or stiff necks in the morning you might be grinding and clenching your teeth. This is known as Bruxism

    Clenching means tightly holding the top and bottom of your teeth together. Grinding is sliding teeth back and forth over each other. 

    Many people grind their teeth at night and may not even know they do it. 

    What Causes Bruxism?

    The cause of bruxism (habit of grinding and clenching) is usually unknown. Stress, sleep disorders, and an abnormal bite are some things that may play a role.  Your dentist can diagnose bruxism by checking for unusual wear spots on your teeth and looking at any related symptoms. Regular dental check-ups are important to find damage in early stages. 

    What Are The Symptoms of Bruxism?

    The symptoms of clenching or grinding your teeth may include the following:
    • jaw pain
    • headaches
    • ear aches
    • clicking jaw
    • stiff neck in the morning
    • sensitive teeth
    • sore teeth
    • facial pain
    • work or cracked teeth or fillings
    • tongue indentations
    • trouble sleeping
    • cheeks bitten
    How Bruxism is Treated

    Treatment depends on each person's situation. Your dentist may recommend one or more of these types of treatments:

    • night guard worn over the teeth while sleeping
    • stress reduction methods
    • exercises to relax jaw muscles
    • warm compresses
    • avoidance of hard foods (nuts, carrots, etc.) and chewing gum
    Your dentist will most likely recommend wearing a night guard during sleep. You can get over-the-counter night guards or a custom night guard made by your dentist from plastic or acrylic. The night guard goes over the upper or lower teeth and prevents them from touching. It protects teeth and helps them from wearing down. 

    If you have any questions about bruxism or any other dental related topic, please contact us by calling 330-733-7911 or send us a website message. 




    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 17 Oct, 2016
    Fluoride is a natural mineral that helps prevent cavities in children and adults by making the outer surface of teeth (the enamel) more resistant to acids that cause tooth decay.

    Benefits Before and After Teeth Come Through

    Fluoride is advantageous to dental health because of its systemic effects before tooth eruption and topical effects after tooth eruption. Before teeth erupt, fluoride taken in from foods, beverages and dietary supplements make tooth enamel stronger, and more resistant to tooth decay. This provides what is called the "systemic" benefit. After teeth erupt, fluoride helps rebuild weakened tooth enamel and reverses early signs of tooth decay. By brushing teeth with fluoride toothpaste or using fluoride dental products the fluoride provides topical benefits.

    Where Fluoride is Found

    Fluoride is naturally found in most water sources, rivers, lakes, wells and even the oceans. For years it has been added to public water supplies to help prevent tooth decay. Certain foods contain fluoride but usually not enough to constitute a significant part of the day's need for cavity prevention. Meat, eggs, vegetables, cereals and fruits have very small but measurable amounts, whereas tea and fish have large amounts. Food cooked in fluoridated water retain fluoride from the cooling water. Bottled or filtrated water usually does NOT contain optimal fluoride.

    Toothpaste with fluoride has been responsible for a significant drop in cavities.  It is recommended to brush at least two times each day (morning and night) for two minutes each time you brush.

    Recommended Brushing Practices for Young Children

    For children younger than 3 years old, start brushing their teeth as soon as their teeth start to appear with non-fluorinated toothpaste or just with a small size (grain of rice) fluorinated toothpaste.

    For children 3 to 6 years old, use no more than a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste. Always supervise your child's brushing to make sure they use the right amount and try to get your child to spit out most of the toothpaste after brushing.

    Mouthwashes

    Fluoridated mouthwashes could also help to prevent cavities but children six years old or younger should not use it unless it has been recommended by a dentist. Many children younger than 6 years old are more likely to swallow it than spit it out because their swallow reflexes are not fully developed.

    Dentists or dental hygienists may apply topical fluoride for children and adults who are at a high risk for cavities at regular appointments for cleanings.

    For more information about fluoride and how it benefits the dental health of the entire family  , please contact us by calling 330-733-7911 or send us a website message .  


    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 03 Aug, 2016
    Many adults in the U.S. have some form of periodontal or gum disease. Periodontal  disease is an infection of the tissues that support teeth. It can range from simple gum inflammation (known as gingivitis) to a more serious disease (known as periodontitis).

    Our mouth is full of bacteria that constantly form plaque (biofilm) on teeth. Brushing and flossing helps get rid of plaque but any plaque that does not get removed hardens and calcifies into tartar that brushing does not remove. Only a professional cleaning by a dentist or a dental hygienist can remove tartar. The longer plaque and tartar are on teeth, the more harmful it becomes.

    Gingivitis
    Gingivitis is an inflammation of gums and is a mild form of periodontal disease. It can be reversed with daily brushing and flossing and regular cleanings by a dental hygienist.  

    This stage of gum disease does not include any loss of bone or tissue that hold teeth in place.

    Periodontitis
    When gingivitis is not treated it will advance to periodontitis. Periodontitis is an inflammation around a tooth. With periodontitis, gums pull away from teeth and form pockets that become infected. The body's immune system reacts to bacteria and tartar build up as infection and starts to break down the bone and connective tissue that hold teeth in place. If not treated, the bones, gums and tissues that support the teeth are destroyed.  Teeth may eventually come loose  and have to be removed or they may just fall out.

    Periodontitis may also contribute to a variety of very serious and life threatening health conditions like heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and pre-term births.    

    Warning Signs
    Warning signs of periodontal disease include:
    • Bleeding gums when brushing or flossing
    • Swollen, red and tender gums
    • Receding gums
    • Halitosis
    • Loose tooth or teeth
    • Pain / sore gums
    • Space that develops between teeth
    • Sensitive teeth

    Dentists and dental hygienists use a tiny ruler called a "probe" to check for and measure any pockets. A "pocket" is a space between a tooth and the surrounding gums. In a healthy mouth, the depth of these pockets is usually between 1 mm and 3 mm.  Any probing measurements that are greater than 4 mm is an indication of tissue inflammation, bone loss, or possible active infection and periodontal disease.

    To stop periodontal disease deep cleaning has to be performed by a dental hygienist. Deep cleaning is a procedure where a hygienist uses specific instruments and techniques to clean above and below the gums to remove tartar and plaque build-up.

    It may take multiple appointments to complete treatment and a local anesthetic may be used to "numb" and keep a patient comfortable during cleaning.

    Periodontitis cannot be reverse but can be stopped and maintained. Good oral hygiene and regular professional dental check-ups will help monitor it.

    To avoid periodontal Disease, it is recommended that you brush two times a day, floss daily and visit your dentist regularly. 

    For more information about periodontal disease or to schedule a dental check-up, please contact us by calling 330-733-7911 or send us a website message at any time.    
        
     
    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 29 Jul, 2016
    When dentures are properly made, they can dramatically enhance your appearance, are comfortable to wear and function well.

    Understanding what makes a good denture will help you avoid frustrations when you are searching for new or replacement dentures.

    Here are a few tips to help you find good dentures.

    Experience and Consistency
    A proven track record of manufacturing quality, natural-looking dentures that feel great and function should be the #1 quality you look for when selecting a dental professional. A denture lab with decades of experience fabricating quality dentures will help you avoid many of the problems people face when purchasing dentures.

    Communicate Directly With The Person Making Your Denture
    Did you ever give instructions to someone who, in turn, provided those instructions to someone else? When this happens, the final instructions are often different than what was originally communicated. It's the "lost in translation" effect.

    To make sure all your denture needs are met, you should be able to communicate directly with not only the dentist but also the denture lab technician who will be creating your custom denture. When you're talking to your dentist about your denture, ask that the lab technician be present for the discussion as well to make sure everything is communicated clearly and your needs are understood.

    Made in Akron 
    Good manufactures stand behind what they make.  Dentures are no different. Look for a dental professional who offers a solid warranty. It is important to know who is fitting your dentures AND who is manufacturing your dentures. Are they made locally by an experienced, reputable denture laboratory or are they made out-of-state or outside the U.S. and shipped to your dental professional?

    Adjustments Should Not Cost More  
    No matter how well dentures are made, they may need adjustments as they are worn and your mouth changes. This is a common occurrence. Adjustments help to ensure your dentures fit as precisely as possible. These types of adjustments should not cost extra. Ask if the price quoted includes adjustments at no additional charge.

    Recommendations  
    One of the best features of a dental professional with decades of experience will be a history and track record of quality service. With references and a little research, you will be able to see if this is someone you can trust.

    Value of Your Dentures
    The price a dental professional advertises for dentures should NOT be your only focus. While price must certainly be taken into consideration, so should the qualities outlined above. Dentures are an important part of your daily life and a long-term investment, one you should feel good about.

    If you would like to learn more about our dentures and how they meet the qualities outlined above, please call us at 330-733-7911 or send us a message here from our website .

      
    By Dr. James George, DDS 15 Jul, 2016
    People often ask me, “Dr. George, can you please tell me what’s needed to make a good denture?”

    It’s a great question and a very important one to answer if you want dentures that not only function well but are comfortable to wear all at a price you can afford.

    A Blend of Science, Art, Experience and Pride 

    Based on my 50+ year dental career serving patients throughout the greater Akron and Canton area, I can tell you that making a good denture requires a very special blend of these four ingredients - science, art, experience and pride.  

    • The Science teaches you how to make a good denture so that it fits and functions properly.

    • The Art of making a denture is a talent that enables a denture to look beautiful and natural. A denture should literally be a work of art.

    • The Experience of crafting dentures is critical for quality, reliability and comfort. You cannot achieve consistent quality, reliability and comfort without years and years of experience.

    • The Pride is a priceless attribute of any denture. It’s a feature that cannot be duplicated. The pride element of a denture is the passion, dedication and genuine care and concern naturally given by the dental professionals who create a custom denture for someone. These qualities make it difficult for a denture to be made with the same craftsmanship anywhere else.

    Over the course of my extensive career as a dentist, I have trained and worked with hundreds of dentists. While many of these dentists excel at one or several of the ingredients outlined above, few are able to excel at all of them simultaneously.

    There is one dentist in northeast Ohio who has the comprehensive scientific training, the natural artistic talent, the years of essential experience and the tremendous sense of pride to deliver patients with dentures they are proud to wear.

    That dentist is Dr. Mark Grucella and his team of denture professionals. You will not find another dentist with the tangible and intangible credentials of Dr. Mark Grucella. He is someone for whom I have the utmost respect and admiration both as a health care professional and as a person.

    When I needed dentures, it was Dr. Grucella that I entrusted to make mine and what a great job he did! If you are searching for quality dentures that function and feel great at an affordable price, I highly recommend Dr. Mark Grucella.

    Checklist of Denture Questions

    I am also providing the following checklist of questions to help you in your search for a good denture. You should be able to confidently answer “Yes” to all these questions:

    1. Can my denture be made in 2 days?
    The same-day dentures you see advertised isn’t a process that is completed all in the same day. It’s usually much more involved and time consuming. Make sure you understand all the details and the exact time required from start to finish. Typically, it takes between 10 and 14 days to make a denture and that is considered to be efficient service. Exceptional service is making a denture in 2 days.  

    2. Is my denture customized?
    Both the teeth and the acrylic can be color matched and shaded to match and compliment your complexion.

    3. Can I get quality without having to pay the highest price?
    Make sure you get a quality denture at a great price. Too many times, people are overly focused on just the price. It’s a balance of quality and price that will serve you best over the long-term.  

    4. Is my denture made by an in-house, local denture laboratory?
    Having your denture made in-house will allow the dentist to supervise each step of the process. When a denture is made outside the dentist’s office or outside the area, it’s difficult to supervise and control the quality.

    5. Will my denture have IPN teeth?
    IPN is the “world standard” in highest quality teeth.

    6. Is my denture injection molded acrylic?
    This makes the denture 5 times stronger than average, provides the best fit and is the most stain and odor resistant.

    Dr. Grucella can answer “Yes” to all these questions and I highly recommend you speak to him about your denture needs by calling 330-733-7911 or sending him a message from GGdentist.com
    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 08 Jul, 2016
    Traditional dentures can and do work great but some people are not completely satisfied with the way their dentures feel or function. There are also people who are struggling with missing or failing teeth who would like to restore their appearance and their ability to enjoy the foods they want but do not want dentures as a replacement for missing teeth.

    There’s a great option for both of these groups of people. It’s called All-On-4 Dental Implants and it will literally change the way you look, feel and live.
       
    Higher Level of Comfort, Function, Confidence and Convenience

    All-On-4 is a great solution for those who want a high level of comfort, function, confidence and convenience. It is a type of dental implant technique where 4 permanent titanium implants are precisely placed in the upper jaw, the lower jaw or if needed, both the upper and lower jaw.

    These 4 implants act just like the roots of natural teeth and become solid and secure anchors to attach a full set of prosthetic teeth.

    People who have them enjoy everything All-On-4 dental implants provide, often commenting they feel an increased sense of confidence and comfort almost immediately.

    Minimum Number of Implants, Maximum Number of Teeth = Cost Savings

    One of the best features about All-On-4 is that only four dental implants are needed to firmly secure natural looking prosthetic teeth on either the top or bottom of your mouth. This not only significantly reduces the amount of time required to replace a full set of teeth using implants but also greatly reduces the cost.  

    A New You

    One of the most pleasantly surprising outcomes for people who choose All-On-4’s is how much it changes their appearance. It restores their smile, their facial features and the way they feel about themselves. The All-On-4 procedure helps to preserve your jawbone which prevents deterioration of the facial structure. With All-On-4 dental implants, the caved-in face and wrinkles around the lips caused by deterioration are virtually eliminated. You will look younger and feel better about yourself!

    In fact, All-On-4’s have been the starting point to a total makeover for many people.

    The confidence regained from All-On-Fours often motivates people to lose weight, exercise, eat healthy, update their wardrobe and take other steps to improve their life. The doorway to a new life has opened many times with All-On-4’s.    

    History of All-On-4

    All-On-4’s are not new. They have been around for quite some time but have seen a significant increase in popularity in the last several years as people have become more aware of this option.

    As far as the success rate, it’s extremely high. There are a number of published studies that report a 98% success rate for All-On-4. As with any dental procedure, it’s important to know if you are a good candidate so you can experience that same success rate.

    Caring for All-On-4 Dental Implants

    Not only does All-On-4 look and feel like natural teeth, you care for them like natural teeth as well. Brush and floss daily just like you would with natural teeth and schedule routine dental check-ups with a dentist. It’s as easy as that.

    Permanent Solution  

    All-On-4 is a permanent solution. These dental implants are designed to last a lifetime with proper care and routine check-ups. The investment you make in yourself will reward you for the rest of your life.

    See if you are a candidate for All-On-4 Dental Implants by scheduling an appointment. Please call (330) 733-7911 or send us a website message at any time. 
    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 24 May, 2016
    When it comes to dentures and implants, the options and features offered are greater today than ever.

    Advancements in science and technology are allowing us to provide our patients with solutions that match their needs, expectations and budgets.

    Appearance, Security and Performance

    Appearance, security and performance are three common features people want from their dentures or implants. Teeth play an extremely vital role in our everyday lives. Pronouncing words, eating food, singing and smiling are all reliant upon the performance of our teeth.

    Let’s discuss four ways to deliver the appearance, security and performance you’re looking to find:

    1. Traditional Full and Partial Dentures
    2. Single and Multiple Implants
    3. Implant Supported Dentures
    4. All-On-Four Dental Implants

    1. Traditional Full and Partial Dentures

    Full and partial dentures have been around for a very long time. In fact, dentures can be traced back to around 700 BC. Since that time, there have been all types of design variations in order to get dentures to look, feel and function like natural teeth. The traditional full or partial denture usually offers the most affordable option but there are exceptions.

    When dentures are properly made, they can dramatically enhance your appearance, feel comfortable to wear and function well.
    It takes a special blend of science, art, experience and pride to craft a quality denture. When dentures are not accurately fitted and poorly made, they can be annoying, aggravating, painful and expensive.

    Understanding what makes a good denture will help you avoid frustrations and wasting money when you are searching for new or replacement dentures.

    History of Quality and Consistency
    Knowing how to consistently manufacture quality, natural-looking dentures that feel great and function over many years should be the #1 quality you look for when selecting a dental professional to fit and fabricate your dentures. A denture lab with decades of experience fabricating quality dentures will help you avoid many of the problems people face when they purchase dentures.

    Made in Akron
    As with any product, good manufacturers stand behind what they make with solid guarantees. Dentures are no different. Look for a dental professional who offers a solid warranty and stands behind the dentures they make. It’s important to know who is fitting your dentures AND who is manufacturing your dentures. Are they made locally here in Akron by an experienced and reputable denture laboratory or are the dentures made out-of-town or outside the United State and shipped to your dental professional?

    Adjustments Should Not Cost More
    No matter how good dentures are made, they will most likely need some adjustments as they are worn and as your mouth changes. This is a common occurrence and one that helps your dentures fit as precisely as possible. These types of adjustments should not cost extra. Make sure you ask if the price you are quoted includes these types of adjustments at no additional charge.

    Recommendations  
    One of the best features of a dental professional with decades of experience is there will be a long history and track record of the type of service and the quality of dentures they have provided to others. With references and a little research, you will be able to clearly see whether this is someone you can trust or if the service and quality is questionable.

    2. Single and Multiple Implants

    A Dental Implant is an artificial tooth root that is placed into the jaw to hold a replacement tooth. Dental Implants are a great option for those who are in good general oral health but have lost a single tooth or multiple teeth due to an accident, injury or some other reason. With proper placement and maintenance, implants can last a lifetime.

    Dental Implants are a tooth-saving dental procedure since they do not rely on neighboring teeth for support. They are both natural looking and feeling. Most of our dental implant patients forget they had even lost a tooth!

    A single implant or multiple implants will allow you to speak and eat with comfort and confidence. They are strong and secure. Our success rate with dental implants is extremely high. These are an excellent option for tooth replacement

    3. Implant-Supported Dentures

    An implant denture or implant-supported denture is a combination of implants and dentures. It’s a type of denture that is secured and supported by dental implants compared to the more traditional method of resting dentures on gums and applying denture adhesives.

    Implant support dentures provide a higher level of security, stability and performance than regular dentures. Therefore, they will not become loose, slip or slide. The dentures are affixed to very strong dental implants which are firmly anchored. Denture implants are long-term solutions that can last a lifetime when cared for properly.

    The added stability and enhanced performance provided by implant dentures creates an invaluable level of confidence. People who wear implant dentures do not worry about their dentures falling out unexpectedly when talking. They consume foods they once had to avoid and they improve their overall self esteem and appearance knowing they have this added level of security.

    The installation of implants to support the denture is straightforward and healthier for the gums and jaw bones than a traditional denture. While the initial cost for implant dentures is higher than traditional dentures, the cost over time is proving to be less. People who wear implant dentures are finding them well worth the investment.

    4. All-On-Four Dental Implants

    All-On-4 Dental Implants are a great solution for those who want a high level of comfort, function, confidence and convenience. It is a type of dental implant technique where 4 permanent titanium implants are precisely placed in the upper jaw, the lower jaw or if needed, both the upper and lower jaw.

    These 4 implants act just like the roots of natural teeth and become solid and secure anchors to attach a full set of prosthetic teeth.

    People who have them enjoy everything All-On-4 dental implants provide, often commenting they feel an increased sense of confidence and comfort almost immediately.

    Cost Savings with All On Four
    One of the best features about All-On-4 is that only four dental implants are needed to firmly secure natural looking prosthetic teeth on either the top or bottom of your mouth. This not only significantly reduces the amount of time required to replace a full set of teeth using implants but also greatly reduces the cost.  

    One of the most surprising outcomes for people who choose All-On-4’s is how much it changes their appearance. It restores their smile, their facial features and the way they feel about themselves.

    The All-On-4 procedure helps to preserve your jawbone which prevents deterioration of the facial structure. With All-On-4 dental implants, the caved-in face and wrinkles around the lips caused by deterioration are virtually eliminated. You will look younger and feel better about yourself!

    All-On-4 is a permanent solution. These dental implants are designed to last a lifetime with proper care and routine check-ups. The investment you make in yourself will reward you for the rest of your life.        

    Akron and Canton area dentists, Dr. James George and Dr. Mark Grucella along with our team of dental professionals have earned a respected reputation for both traditional dentures, implant supported dentures and All On Four over the last 50 years.

    Our in-house denture lab located in Akron, Ohio is one of the region’s largest. The extensive professional experience provided by Dr. George and Dr. Grucella combined with vast resources offered by their in-house dental lab, offers patients a long history of quality, service and satisfaction.

    Contact Us to Determine What’s Best for You

    To learn more about Dr. George, Dr. Grucella, our team of dental professionals, and our large in-house dental lab and to schedule an appointment, please call 330-733-7911 or visit www.GGDentist.com .

    No matter what your dental issue or how long it’s been since you have seen a dentist, Dr. James George, Dr. Mark Grucella and our team of dental professionals care about Making You Smile!          
    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 13 May, 2016
    Dental sealants are vinyl material that is placed in the grooves and pits of adult back teeth (molars and premolars) to prevent cavities.  Sealants are applied to the chewing surfaces of the teeth where cavities occur more often. Molars and premolar teeth usually have deep grooves and pits that toothbrush bristles cannot reach to remove food and plaque (biofilm).

    Sealants protect these vulnerable areas by "sealing out" biofilm and food. Dentists or dental hygienists place the sealants which are easy to apply (NO drilling!) and can be done at a regular cleaning appointments.

    Sealants are usually white or teeth color and may last for years but they have to be checked regularly to make sure they don't chip. If they do chip, they need to be reapplied.

    Children age 6 and up along with teenagers are good candidates for sealants, however adults without cavities or fillings in their molar and premolar teeth would also benefit from sealants.

    Most insurance companies cover the cost of sealants for children and teenagers.

    Learn more about dental sealants by calling us at 330-733-7911 or send us a message here from our website .  We are happy to tell you even more about dental sealants!   
    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 28 Apr, 2016
    The options for denture wearers continue to grow as technology, materials, knowledge and skills continue to evolve. Today, there are many choices that will enhance the performance of dentures so they provide the comfort and functionality desired.    

    An implant supported denture is one of these options. Unlike a regular denture that rests on the gums, an implant supported denture is attached to and supported by firmly anchored implants designed to last a lifetime.

    Benefits of Implant Supported Dentures
    An implant supported denture is much more stable than a regular denture. This enables someone with an implant supported denture to speak and eat with confidence. They do not have to worry about their dentures coming loose. In addition, foods that once could not be eaten with traditional dentures can be enjoyed once again.

    Types of Implant Supported Dentures
    There are basically two types of implant supported dentures:

    1. Bar Attachment Dentures - A thin metal bar that follows the curve of the jaw is attached to two or more implants that have been placed in the jawbone. The denture fits securely over the bar and clipped into place.

    2. Implant LOCATOR® Attachment Dentures - Each implant placed into the jawbone has a solid male attachment that fits securely into a corresponding female attachment on the denture. This highly versatile and durable attachment is self-aligning and very easy for the denture wearer to use while providing for a natural feel and function.
    Both types of implant support dentures provide a denture wearer with high levels of strength, security and performance.

    The Process
    Implants are usually placed in the jawbone at the front of the mouth. This area tends to contain the densest bone which provides the strongest anchor for placing implants.
    The time it takes to complete the placement of the implants so they are ready to receive the dentures depends on many factors and varies from person to person.
    Once the implants are ready, the dentures can be attached and used immediately.  

    Cost of Implant Supported Dentures
    The cost of an implant supported denture is not the same for every patient. To determine an accurate cost, an exam and evaluation must be conducted by a dental professional who has special training in Implantology.

    During this exam, it will be determined if a patient is a good candidate for implant supported dentures. If the patient is a good candidate, a specific plan and design will be developed that is customized for the specific patient. Then, a cost estimate can be provided along with an expected time-frame.

    Contact Us for More Information About Implant Supported Dentures
    The best way to decide if implant supported dentures are right for you is to contact us. We can determine if you are a good candidate, discuss your options, answer all your questions and provide you with a cost estimate and timeframe based on your unique and specific needs.

    I (Dr. Mark Grucella) have advanced training in Implantology and my vast experience will deliver you with the professional advice and guidance needed to determine if implant supported dentures are the best option for you.

    Please contact us by calling 330-733-7911 or send us a message from our website at any time.
    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 15 Apr, 2016
    You’ve probably heard the phrase “My Dog Ate My Homework” but have you ever heard “My Dog Ate My Denture”?

    In our 50+ year history fabricating and repairing custom dentures locally in the Akron and Canton areas, it’s actually something we’ve heard many times.

    Why Dogs Eat Dentures

    If you’re a dog owner, you understand the special relationship and close bond that is formed between a dog and its owner. A dog has an acute sense of smell and knows the unique scent of its owner. Anything you wear from clothes to dentures will identify you to your dog. That scent is comforting to your dog and he or she wants to be close to that scent because it’s tied to you. It’s something that likely makes your dog happy.

    Another enjoyable past time for dogs is chewing hich serves many purposes. For puppies, it's a way to relieve “toothing pain” caused by new incoming teeth. For more mature dogs, it's how they keep their jaws strong and teeth clean.

    When you combine your dog’s love for you and need to chew, a denture can easily become a target! If your dentures have turned into little pieces scattered across the floor and your dog has a guilty look on its face, you’re going to need to get your dentures replaced. Here are a few things to consider when you need a new denture.

    Qualities Needed To Make a Good Denture

    Making a good denture requires a special blend of four ingredients - science, art, experience and pride:

    • The Science teaches you how to make a good denture so that it fits and functions properly.

    • The Art of making a denture is a talent that enables a denture to look beautiful and natural. A denture should literally be a work of art.

    • The Experience of crafting dentures is critical for quality, reliability and comfort. You cannot achieve consistent quality, reliability and comfort without years and years of experience.

    • The Pride is a priceless attribute of any denture. It’s a feature that cannot be duplicated. The pride element of a denture is the passion, dedication and genuine care and concern naturally given by the dental professionals who create a custom denture for someone. These qualities make it difficult for a denture to be made with the same craftsmanship anywhere else.

    Quality Manufacturing History of Akron

    Good manufactures stand behind what they make. It’s a long and proud tradition of how we have manufactured products here in the Akron area. Dentures are no different.

    It is important to know who is fitting your dentures AND who is manufacturing your dentures. Are they made locally by an experienced, reputable denture laboratory or are they made out-of-state or outside the U.S. and shipped to your dental professional?

    Cost of Future Adjustments

    No matter how well dentures are made, they will most likely need adjustments as they are worn and your mouth changes. Adjustments help to ensure your dentures fit as precisely as possible. These types of adjustments should not cost anything extra. Be sure to ask if the price quoted includes adjustments at no additional charge.

    Recommendations from Other Denture Wearers

    Most people want their dentures made by professionals with extensive experience, a reputation of consistent quality and a long track record of great customer service. Do your research and ask others to offer their opinions and recommendations to find someone you can trust.

    It’s About Value Not Price

    The price a dental professional advertises for dentures should NOT be your only focus. While price must certainly be taken into consideration, so should the qualities outlined above. Dentures are an important part of your daily life and a long-term investment, they should feel good and you should feel good about your investment.

    Questions To Ask

    You should be able to answer “Yes” to all these questions to feel comfortable with whom you entrust to make your dentures:

    1. Can my denture be made in 2 days?

    The same-day dentures you see advertised isn’t a process that is completed all in the same day. It’s usually much more involved and time consuming. Make sure you understand all the details and the exact time required from start to finish. Typically, it takes between 10 and 14 days to make a denture and that is considered to be efficient service. Exceptional service is making a denture in 2 days.

    2. Is my denture customized?
    Both the teeth and the acrylic can be color matched and shaded to match and compliment your complexion.

    3. Can I get quality without having to pay the highest price?
    Make sure you get a quality denture at a great price. Too many times, people are overly focused on just the price. It’s a balance of quality and price that will serve you best over the long-term.

    4. Is my denture made by an in-house, local denture laboratory?
    Having your denture made in-house will allow the dentist to supervise each step of the process. When a denture is made outside the dentist’s office or outside the area, it’s difficult to supervise and control the quality.

    5. Will my denture have IPN teeth?
    IPN is the “world standard” in highest quality teeth.

    6. Is my denture injection molded acrylic?
    This makes the denture 5 times stronger than average, provides the best fit and is the most stain and odor resistant.

    Contact Us With Your “Dog Ate My Denture” Story

    If your dog ate your dentures, we would love to hear your story! We would also appreciate the opportunity to show you how we’ve earned a reputation for delivering patients with quality dentures and incredible, friendly service for over 50 years.

    Please contact us by calling 330-733-7911 or send us a message from our website at any time.
    By Dr. Mark Grucella, DDS 12 Oct, 2015
    The American Academy of Pediatric dentistry recommends that a child should be seen by a pediatric dentist before their first birthday or within 6 months after their first tooth erupts.

    Primary teeth typically begin erupting around 6 months of age. Usually the first visit is for educational and nutritional counseling purposes as well as to establish a dentist for emergency situations - children tend to run into things all the time and knock their front teeth!

    Taking your child to the dentist at a young age is the best way to prevent tooth decay.

    General dentists usually see children at age 3 and up. If your dentist does not accept children under 3 years of age, you should ask for a pediatric dentist referral.

    Visit our the Just For Kid's page of our website for tips about proper dental hygiene for children as well as various fun activities to help your child learn more about dental care.
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